Wooded Path

FAQs

What is “green?”
What is a green funeral?
How do I plan a green funeral?
Where can I find a green funeral home?
Where can I find a green cemetery?
What is the Green Burial Council?
May I create a cemetery on my own land?
Is embalming green?
Are cremation and alkaline hydrolysis green processes?
How do I learn more?

What is “green?”

How is “green” defined? How about natural, eco-friendly, bio-friendly, earth-friendly, etc.? With the range of terminology and related definitions in use currently, this can be a challenge.

Regarding green funeral homes, products and green burial grounds we take guidance from and adhere to the standards put forth by the Green Burial Council.

The Green Burial Council is an independent, non-profit organization that promotes environmentally sustainable end-of-life rituals. It does so by establishing standards for green burial products and processes, and promoting burial as a means of acquiring, restoring and stewarding natural areas.

Click here to learn more about the Green Burial Council or their standards for green funeral homes, products, and burial grounds.

What is a green funeral?

How might a green funeral differ from other contemporary funerals? While there is no one standard for a green funeral, planning decisions may be made which, to varying degrees, influence the environmental impact of a range of end-of-life practices.

A preference for environmentally sustainable end-of life practices may influence many choices, including:

  • The choice of materials used to create the casket, urn, or shroud selected
  • How a body is prepared and what embalming are fluids used, if any
  • The type and location of the cemetery or burial ground selected
  • The environmental impact of the living tributes selected
  • Options for permanent memorials to the deceased
  • The nature and location of an end-of-life ritual
  • The elements of a home or public visitation
  • The nature of a memorial gathering

How do I plan a green funeral?

Here are 3 points to remember about funeral planning, whether green or not:

  • Individuals and families may choose to care for their dead themselves. Although this hands-on approach is not for everyone, it can be very satisfying for some. To learn more about what practical and legal elements this approach requires, plan to conduct thorough research. Much information is available on the world-wide web.
  • Many individuals and families retain the services of a funeral home experienced in caring for the dead, and handling the related hands-on and legal requirements. This approach provides professional resources for the bereaved to rely upon and lean on. With the advent of New England Green Funerals, families desiring green funeral arrangements may have their needs met professionally.
  • The best funeral planning strategy is to plan in advance of a need. This is especially true with green funerals, where environmentally-oriented choices are important to an individual, yet not currently the norm in society. Pre-arranged funerals offer peace of mind to those involved. There are also significant financial advantages to pre-planning with a licensed funeral home.

Where can I find a green funeral home?

Click here to connect with our green funeral homes located in Maine and Vermont.

Where can I find a green cemetery?

Click here for green burial grounds located in Maine and Vermont.

What is the Green Burial Council?

The Green Burial Council is an independent, non-profit organization that promotes environmentally sustainable end-of-life rituals. It does so by establishing standards for green burial products and processes, and promoting burial as a means of acquiring, restoring and stewarding natural areas. One, two or three “leaf-ratings” are applied to organizations, reflecting their ability to meet some or all of these established standards.
Click here to learn more about the Green Burial Council or their standards for green funeral homes, burial grounds and products.

May I create a cemetery on my own land?

Family burial grounds are an option in both Maine and Vermont. Click here to learn more.

Is embalming green?

Some controversy exists about contemporary embalming practices. Specifically, there is some concern that the formaldehyde-based fluids often used in the process may be both environmentally harmful and carcinogenic. The use of alternative fluids by our funeral homes allows for the final viewing of a loved one with improved appearance, without the health or environmental concerns associated with formaldehyde-based embalming.

Are cremation and alkaline hydrolysis green processes?

The two processes are options for disposition of human remains, i.e. alternatives to full body burial. Both reduce the body to bone matter. Cremation makes use of heat and flame and alkaline hydrolysis, also known as resomation, makes use of water, heat, and alkaline substances. Cremation has been an option for many centuries while alkaline hydrolysis has only recently, and on a limited basis, become an available option for the disposition of human remains. There is disagreement regarding the environmental impact of each of these options, centering on the use of energy called for by, and by-products created by, these processes. Providers of these services, and the world-wide web, are good sources for more in-depth information.

How do I learn more?

Most people have little experience in end-of-life preparations, and even less experience with green funeral and burial preparations.  Given this, and the importance of green options to the individuals and families that we serve, we have developed an educational program on the topic of Green Funerals and Burials.  This workshop provides a higher level of detail than available via our web site.  Our relaxed, informative, one-hour program includes plenty of opportunity for questions & answers.  If you, or a group that you are a member of, are interested in attending or offering such a program, please contact our location nearest you.”

Click here to connect with our green funeral homes located in Maine and Vermont.


Top